Geysers: Watch them go!

My trip to Iceland was the first time I’d ever seen a geyser erupt. Instead of trying to explain in words how compelling I thought it was, I thought I’d just round up some of my best geyser photos and share them here. Enjoy!

The land surrounding Iceland's main geysers, Geysir and Strokkur, is scattered with boiling streams and steam vents. The entire area smells like rotten eggs, thanks to the natural gases found in the hot springs.

The land surrounding Iceland’s main geysers, Geysir and Strokkur, is scattered with boiling streams and steam vents. The entire area smells like rotten eggs, thanks to the natural gases found in the hot springs.

Blesi is one of the non-erupting hot spring near Geysir and Strokkur. Blesi has two pools, one of which is this striking blue color, thanks to the minerals in the water.

Blesi is one of the non-erupting hot spring near Geysir and Strokkur. Blesi has two pools, one of which is this striking blue color, thanks to the minerals in the water.

Blesi's second pool

Blesi’s second pool

This is Geysir, the erupting hot spring that gave every other geyser its name. It spouted frequent massive eruptions until the early 1900s, when it was slowly killed off, allegedly because Icelanders dumped rocks and soap in it to make it erupt on command.

This is Geysir, the erupting hot spring that gave every other geyser its name. It spouted frequent massive eruptions until the early 1900s, when it was slowly killed off, allegedly because Icelanders dumped rocks and soap in it to make it erupt on command.

Strokkur is not as large as Geysir, but continues to erupt faithfully every 5-10 minutes, making it a popular tourist stop alongside Geysir. This is what Strokkur looks like between eruptions.

Strokkur is not as large as Geysir, but continues to erupt faithfully every 5-10 minutes, making it a popular tourist stop alongside Geysir. This is what Strokkur looks like between eruptions.

 

My favorite part of a geyser's eruption is this initial bubble, as the pressure starts to build. (Strokkur)

My favorite part of a geyser’s eruption is this initial bubble, as the pressure starts to build. (Strokkur)

Strokkur's initial burst through the bubble

Strokkur’s initial burst through the bubble

Strokkur

Strokkur

Strokkur

Strokkur

As the eruption ends, the water drains back into the hole...

As the eruption ends, the water drains back into the hole…

...before filling again.

…before filling again.

And sometimes it bubbles back up before completely calming.

And sometimes it bubbles back up before completely calming.

Ta-da! (Photo by Dave Vickery)

Ta-da! (Photo by Dave Vickery)

Dave and Strokkur

Dave and Strokkur

Tourists from all over the world gather to watch Strokkur erupt.

Tourists from all over the world gather to watch Strokkur erupt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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